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Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians:  Let us therefore without ceasing hold fast by our hope and by the earnest of our righteousness, which is Jesus Christ who took up our sins in His own body upon the tree, who did no sin, neither was guile found in His mouth, but for our sakes He endured all things, that we might live in Him. Let us therefore become imitators of His endurance; and if we should suffer for His name's sake, let us glorify Him. For He gave this example to us in His own person, and we believed this.
Alt.:--Let us then continually persevere in our hope, and the earnest of our righteousness, which is Jesus Christ, “who bore our sins in His own body on the tree,” (1 Pet. 2:24) “who did no sin, neither was guile found in His mouth,”(1 Pet. 2:22) but endured all things for us, that we might live in Him. (Cf. 1 John 4:9) Let us then be imitators of His patience; and if we suffer (cf. Acts 5:41; 1 Pet. 4:16) for His name’s sake, let us glorify Him. (Some read, "we glorify Him.") For He has set us this example (1 Pet. 2:21) in Himself, and we have believed that such is the case.

Justin Martyr, The First Apology:  And when the Spirit of prophecy speaks as predicting things that are to come to pass, He speaks in this way: “For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. And He shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people; and they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.” (Isaiah 2:3) And that it did so come to pass, we can convince you. For from Jerusalem there went out into the world, men, twelve in number, and these illiterate, of no ability in speaking: but by the power of God they proclaimed to every race of men that they were sent by Christ to teach to all the word of God; and we who formerly used to murder one another do not only now refrain from making war upon our enemies, but also, that we may not lie nor deceive our examiners, willingly die confessing Christ. For that saying, “The tongue has sworn, but the mind is unsworn,” (Eurip., Hipp., 608) might be imitated by us in this matter. But if the soldiers enrolled by you, and who have taken the military oath, prefer their allegiance to their own life, and parents, and country, and all kindred, though you can offer them nothing incorruptible, it were verily ridiculous if we, who earnestly long for incorruption, should not endure all things, in order to obtain what we desire from Him who is able to grant it.

Ignatius, Epistle to Polycarp:  Let not those that seem to be plausible and yet teach strange doctrine dismay thee. Stand thou firm, as an anvil when it is smitten. It is the part of a great athlete to receive blows and be victorious. But especially must we for God's sake endure all things, that He also may endure us. Be thou more diligent than thou art. Mark the seasons. Await Him that is above every season, the Eternal, the Invisible, who became visible for our sake, the Impalpable, the Impassible, who suffered for our sake, who endured in all ways for our sake.

Ignatius, Epistle to the Smyrneans:  May all things therefore abound unto you in grace, for ye are worthy. Ye refreshed me in all things, and Jesus Christ shall refresh you. In my absence and in my presence ye cherished me. May God recompense you; for whose sake if ye endure all things, ye shall attain unto Him.

Ignatius, Epistle to the Smyrneans:  For if these things were done by our Lord in semblance, then am I also a prisoner in semblance. And why then have I delivered myself over to death, unto fire, unto sword, unto wild beasts? But near to the sword, near to God; in company with wild beasts, in company with God. Only let it be in the name of Jesus Christ, so that we may suffer together with Him. I endure all things, seeing that He Himself enableth me, who is perfect Man.

Pseudo-Clementine Homilies:  And Peter answered: “You have deemed unjust what is most just. If you are inclined, will you listen to me?” And my father said: “With all my heart.” And Peter said: “What is your opinion? Suppose that there were two kings, enemies to each other, and having their countries cut off from each other; and suppose that some one of the subjects of one of them were to be caught in the country of the other, and to incur the penalty of death on this account: now if he were let off from the punishment by receiving a blow instead of death, is it not plain that he who let him off is a lover of man?” And our father said: “Most certainly.” And Peter said: “Now suppose that this same person were to steal from some one something belonging to him or to another; and if when caught he were to pay double, instead of suffering the punishment that was due to him, namely, paying four times the amount, and being also put to death, as having been caught in the territories of the enemy; is it not your opinion that he who accepts double, and lets him off from the penalty of death, is a lover of man?” And our father said: “He certainly seems so.” And Peter said: “Why then? Is it not the duty of him who is in the kingdom of another, and that, too, a hostile and wicked monarch, to be pleasing to all (literally "to flatter") for the sake of life, and when force is applied to him, to yield still more, to accost those who do not accost him, to reconcile enemies, not to quarrel with those who are angry, to give his own property freely to all who ask, and such like?” And our father said: “He should with reason endure all things rather, if he prefers life to them.”

Mathetes, Epistle to Diognetus:  For the Christians are distinguished from other men neither by country, nor language, nor the customs which they observe. For they neither inhabit cities of their own, nor employ a peculiar form of speech, nor lead a life which is marked out by any singularity. The course of conduct which they follow has not been devised by any speculation or deliberation of inquisitive men; nor do they, like some, proclaim themselves the advocates of any merely human doctrines. But, inhabiting Greek as well as barbarian cities, according as the lot of each of them has determined, and following the customs of the natives in respect to clothing, food, and the rest of their ordinary conduct, they display to us their wonderful and confessedly striking (literally, “paradoxical”) method of life. They dwell in their own countries, but simply as sojourners. As citizens, they share in all things with others, and yet endure all things as if foreigners. Every foreign land is to them as their native country, and every land of their birth as a land of strangers. They marry, as do all [others]; they beget children; but they do not destroy their offspring (literally, “cast away fœtuses”). They have a common table, but not a common bed. (Otto omits “bed,” which is an emendation, and gives the second “common” the sense of unclean.) They are in the flesh, but they do not live after the flesh. (Cf. 2 Cor. 10:3.) They pass their days on earth, but they are citizens of heaven. (Cf. Phil. 3:20) They obey the prescribed laws, and at the same time surpass the laws by their lives. They love all men, and are persecuted by all. They are unknown and condemned; they are put to death, and restored to life. (Cf. 2 Cor. 6:9) They are poor, yet make many rich; (Cf. 2 Cor. 6:10) they are in lack of all things, and yet abound in all; they are dishonoured, and yet in their very dishonour are glorified. They are evil spoken of, and yet are justified; they are reviled, and bless; (Cf. 2 Cor. 4:12) they are insulted, and repay the insult with honour; they do good, yet are punished as evil-doers. When punished, they rejoice as if quickened into life; they are assailed by the Jews as foreigners, and are persecuted by the Greeks; yet those who hate them are unable to assign any reason for their hatred.

Theonas of Alexandria, Epistle to Lucianus:  Discharge the official duties to which you are severally appointed with the utmost fear of God and affection to your prince, and perfect carefulness. Consider that every command of the emperor which does not offend God has proceeded from God Himself; and execute it in love as well as in fear, and with all cheerfulness. For there is nothing which so well refreshes a man who is wearied out with weighty cares as the seasonable cheerfulness and benign patience of an intimate servant; nor, again, on the other hand, does anything so much annoy and vex him as the moroseness and impatience and grumbling of his servant. Be such things far from you Christians, whose walk is in zeal for the faith. (Qui zelo fidei inceditis.) But in order that God may be honoured (1 Peter 4:11) in yourselves, suppress ye and tread down all your vices of mind and body. Be clothed with patience and courtesy; be replenished with the virtues and the hope of Christ. Bear all things for the sake of your Creator Himself; endure all things; overcome and get above all things, that ye may win Christ the Lord. Great are these duties, and full of painstaking. But he that striveth for the mastery (1 Cor. 9:25) is temperate in all things; and they do it to obtain a corruptible crown, but we an incorruptible.

Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies:  There are things practiced in a vulgar style by some people, such as control over pleasures. For as, among the heathen, there are those who, from the impossibility of obtaining what one sees, and from fear of men, and also for the sake of greater pleasures, abstain from the delights that are before them; so also, in the case of faith, some practice self-restraint, either out of regard to the promise or from fear of God. Well, such self-restraint is the basis of knowledge, and an approach to something better, and an effort after perfection. For “the fear of the Lord,” it is said, “is the beginning of wisdom.” (Prov. 1:7) But the perfect man, out of love, “beareth all things, endureth all things,” (1 Cor. 13:7) “as not pleasing man, but God.” (1 Thes. 2:4) Although praise follows him as a consequence, it is not for his own advantage, but for the imitation and benefit of those who praise him.

Lactantius, The Epitome of the Divine Institutes:  Faith also is a great part of justice; and this ought especially to be preserved by us, who bear the name of faith, especially in religion, because God is before and to be preferred to man. And if it is a glorious thing to undergo death in behalf of friends, of parents, and of children, that is, in behalf of man, and if he who has done this obtains lasting memory and praise, how much more so in behalf of God, who is able to bestow eternal life in return for temporal death? Therefore, when a necessity of this kind happens, that we are compelled to turn aside from God, and to pass over to the rites of the heathens, no fear, no terror should turn us aside from guarding the faith delivered to us. Let God be before our eyes, in our heart, by whose inward help we may overcome the pain of our flesh, and the torments applied to our body. Then let us think of nothing else but the rewards of an immortal life. And thus, even though our limbs should be torn in pieces, or burnt, we shall easily endure all things which the madness of tyrannical cruelty shall contrive against us. Lastly, let us strive to undergo death itself, not unwillingly or timidly, but willingly and undauntedly, as those who know what glory we are about to have in the presence of God, having triumphed over the world and coming to the things promised us; with what good things and how great blessedness we shall be compensated for these brief evils of punishments, and the injuries of this life. But if the opportunity of this glory shall be wanting, faith will have its reward even in peace.

Gregory Nazianzen:  Jesus Who Chose The Fishermen, Himself also useth a net, and changeth place for place. Why? Not only that He may gain more of those who love God by His visitation; but also, as it seems to me, that He may hallow more places. To the Jews He becomes as a Jew that He may gain the Jews; to them that are under the Law as under the Law, that He may redeem them that are under the Law; to the weak as weak, that He may save the weak. He is made all things to all men that He may gain all. Why do I say, All things to all men? For even that which Paul could not endure to say of himself I find that the Saviour suffered. For He is made not only a Jew, and not only doth He take to Himself all monstrous and vile names, but even that which is most monstrous of all, even very sin and very curse; not that He is such, but He is called so. For how can He be sin, Who setteth us free from sin; and how can He be a curse, Who redeemeth us from the curse of the Law? But it is in order that He may carry His display of humility even to this extent, and form us to that humility which is the producer of exaltation. As I said then, He is made a Fisherman; He condescendeth to all; He casteth the net; He endureth all things, that He may draw up the fish from the depths, that is, Man who is swimming in the unsettled and bitter waves of life.

Augustine, On Patience:  Let thus much have been said with regard to charity, without which in us there cannot be true patience, because in good men it is the love of God which endureth all things, as in bad men the lust of the world. But this love is in us by the Holy Spirit which was given us. Whence, of Whom cometh in us love, of Him cometh patience. But the lust of the world, when it patiently bears the burdens of any manner of calamity, boasts of the strength of its own will, like as of the stupor of disease, not robustness of health. This boasting is insane: it is not the language of patience, but of dotage. A will like this in that degree seems more patient of bitter ills, in which it is more greedy of temporal good things, because more empty of eternal.

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Comments
William Barclay:  Love bears everything with triumphant fortitude. The verb which is used here (hupomenein) is one of the great Greek words. It is generally translated to bear or to endure; but what this word really describes is not the spirit which can sit down and passively bear things, but the spirit which, in bearing them, can conquer and transmute them. It has been defined as "a masculine constancy under trial."

George Matheson who lost his sight and who was disappointed in love wrote in one of his prayers that he might accept God's will, "Not with dumb resignation but with holy joy; not only with the absence of murmur but with a song of praise." Love can bear things, not with passive resignation, but with triumphant fortitude because it knows that God is love and that "a father's hand will never cause his child a needless tear."

Barnes' Notes:  Endureth all things. Bears up under, sustains, and does not murmur. Bears up under all persecutions at the hand of man; all efforts to injure the person, property, or reputation; and bears all that may be laid upon us in the providence and by the direct agency of God. Comp. Job 13:15. The connexion requires us to understand it principally of our treatment at the hands of our fellow-men.

BT Internet:  uJpomenw, endure, remain behind

"Like Christ on the cross, love endures scorn, failure, ingratitude ... At the end shines out the light of Easter. For love never ends." --Deluz

St. John Chrysostom, Homily 33:  And even if these good things should not turn out according to its hope, but the other person should prove yet more intolerable, it bears even these. For, saith he, it "endureth all things."

Adam Clarke:  Endureth all things.] panta upomenei?
Bears up under all persecutions and mal-treatment from open enemies and professed friends; bears adversities with an even mind, as it submits with perfect resignation to every dispensation of the providence of God; and never says of any trial, affliction, or insult, this cannot be endured.

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible:  endureth all things;
that are disagreeable to the flesh; all afflictions, tribulations, temptations, persecutions, and death itself, for the elect's sake, for the sake of the Gospel, and especially for the sake of Christ Jesus.

John W. Gregson:  It remains strong through adversity. Love is never hissed off the stage by a bad actor; it has its part to play on the stage of life.

Matthew Henry:  [Charity] will pass by and put up with injuries, without indulging anger or cherishing revenge, will be patient upon provocation, and long patient, panta hypomenei--holds firm, though it be much shocked, and borne hard upon; sustains all manner of injury and ill usage, and bears up under it, such as curses, contumacies, slanders, prison, exile, bonds, torments, and death itself, for the sake of the injurious, and of others; and perseveres in this firmness. Note, What a fortitude and firmness fervent love will give the mind! What cannot a lover endure for the beloved and for his sake! How many slights and injuries will he put up with! How many hazards will he run and how many difficulties encounter!

Jamieson, Fausset, & Brown:  endureth--persecutions in a patient and loving spirit.

BW Johnson:  Endureth all things. Endures patiently persecution and suffering. The cardinal quality of fortitude, hardihood, unyielding persistence is meant.

Steve Lewis:  Endures all things (hupomeno) = literally, to remain under; to bear up under suffering or external circumstances that are unpleasant. The loving person suffers in silence without telling others all his personal troubles or giving way to selfishness under stress.

Mark Heber Miller:  (Love) endures all things.

The phrase is variously rendered: WMS: it gives us power to endure in anything; TCNT: ever patient; BER: endures without limit; NJB: to endure whatever comes; WEY: she is full of endurance. Some translations have made it apparent that "love" is being viewed in the feminine. (See Weymouth) Few could argue that a mother’s love lasts a lifetime. Mothers seldom give up on their children. So, they still treat full grown men as their little boys. One may always return to mother; and, often at death "mom" and "God" are final words.

Families must often endure the attitudes or actions of others within the household circle. It takes endurance to continue to love despite the worst. We experience this need for love’s endurance at work, at school, in our daily life. Though Paul has already mentioned "love is long-suffering (or patient)" this endurance must be something different. If love ever ends, or fails to endure, then it may not have been love in the first place. Agape-love continues to the last breath. It never tires of forgiving others because it does not put itself on such a lofty pedestal. Those with a "short-fuse" simply are not possessed of agape-love, but rather self-centered, egotistical arrogance.

C L Parker:  Love endures all things with triumphant fortitude, "Panta hupomenei." Love endures when it can no longer believe or hope. It endures without limit for the sake of others. The word for “endure,” is, “hupomenei,” the present indicative active of “hupomeno,” which means, “to bear up courageously with triumphant fortitude.” The same word is used in Heb. 12:2, to describe how Jesus endured the cross with triumphant fortitude. Love does not allow trials to break or mar its spirit; it goes through trials with perfect confidence in God. Love endures all things so that the God of love may manifest His power and love through the lovely gifts that He has given. Indeed, one may have to suffer the most determined vicious persecution from unbelieving worldly and religious people for the sake of Christ's spiritual gifts. Acts 14v19-22; 13:50-62; 1 Cor. 4:11-13; 2 Tim. 2:10-13; James 1:12. God's love, imparted to us by the Holy Spirit, enables Christians to always face life's problems and evil people with triumphant fortitude. Rom. 5:1-5.

Robertson's Word Studies:  {endureth all things} (panta hupomenei). Perseveres. Carries on like a stout-hearted soldier. If one knows Sir Joshua Reynolds's beautiful painting of the Seven Virtues (the four cardinal virtues of the Stoics--temperance, prudence, fortitude, justice--and the three Christian graces--faith, hope, love), he will find them all exemplified here as marks of love (the queen of them all).

Vincent's Word Studies:  Endureth (upomenei). An advance on beareth: patient acquiescence, holding its ground when it can no longer believe nor hope.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes:  It endureth all things--Whatever the injustice, the malice, the cruelty of men can inflict. He can not only do, but likewise suffer, all things, through Christ who strengtheneth him.

Wesley, Sermon 22:  Lastly. It "endureth all things." This completes the character of him that is truly merciful. He endureth not some, not many, things only; not most, but absolutely all things. Whatever the injustice, the malice, the cruelty of men can inflict, he is able to suffer. He calls nothing intolerable; he never says of anything, "This is not to be borne." No; he can not only do, but suffer, all things through Christ which strengtheneth him. And all he suffers does not destroy his love, nor impair it in the least. It is proof against all. It is a flame that burns even in the midst of the great deep. "Many waters cannot quench" his "love, neither can the floods drown it." It triumphs over all. It "never faileth," either in time or in eternity.

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