HTTP://WWW.STUDYLOVE.ORG
STUDY LOVE
This page expanded February 21, 2015
Versions Greek Feast Texts Others
1 Clement Religions Dictionaries
Bible
Comments Index

Charity
(he- aGApe-)
he agape

Versions
KJV and a Few Others: "Charity"
Wyc: "Charite"
Others: "Love"
ED: "The love"
Godbey: "Divine love"
Mace: "Social affection"
Bis: "Loue"
HWP: "Wen you get love an aloha"
Luther, Elb, Sch: "Die Liebe"
HTB: "De liefde"
CRO: "Ljubav"
Wul: "Friaþwa"
DN: "Kærligheden"
DNB: "Kjærligheten"
Ice: "Kærleikurinn"
SV: "Kärleken"
Vul: "Caritas"
RVR, SSE: "La caridad"
NBLH, NVI: "El amor"
AA, VFL: "O amor"
FD: "L'amour"
FLS: "La charité"
HCV: "Moun ki gen renmen" (people with love)
ALB: "Dashuria"
Raa: "Rakkaus"
SND: "Ang pag-ibig"
OJB: "Ahavah"

Back to Top

Greek
Word: aGApe- (26)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    aGApe-, ag-ah'-pay; from agaPAo- (25), to love (in a social or moral sense).
    Love, that is, affection or benevolence; specifically (plural) a love feast. KJV "(feast of) charity ([-ably]), dear, love."
  • Zodhiates:
    Love, affectionate regard, goodwill, benevolence. With reference to God's love, it is God's willful direction toward man. It involves God doing what is best for man and not necessarily what man desires. For example, "For God so loved [e-GAPe-sen] the world, that he gave". What did He give? Not what man wanted, but what God knew man needed, i.e., His Son to bring forgiveness to man. (John 3:16)
    1. Generally, love.
      • As in "Shall I come unto you with a rod, or in love," means full of love, all love. (1 Cor. 4:21)
      • "The kingdom of His dear Son [the Son of His love]," is the same as ho agape-TOS, beloved son. (Col. 1:13)
      • Spoken more especially of good will toward others, the love of our neighbor, brotherly affection, which the Lord Jesus commands and inspires. (John 15:13; 17:26; Rom. 13:10; 1 Cor. 13:1; Heb. 6:10; 1 John 4:7)
      • "The God of love" meaning the author and source of love, who Himself is love. (2 Cor. 13:11)
      • "The love of the spirit" meaning that love which the Spirit inspires. (Rom. 15:30)
      • Followed by eis (1519), unto, with the accusative. (2 Cor. 2:4, 8; 2 Thess. 1:3, love unto others; 1 Pet. 4:8)
      • Followed by en (1722), in, with the dative. (John 13:35, "love one to another"; 2 Cor. 8:7)
    2. he- aGApe- tou theOU or tou chrisTOU, specifically "the love of God" or "of Christ". Here the genitive is sometimes subjective or active and sometimes objective or passive.
      1. Subjectively or actively means the love which God or Christ exercises toward Christians.
        • The love that is derived from God. (Rom. 5:5; Eph. 2:4; 2 Thess. 3:5)
        • Followed by eis (1519), unto someone. (Rom. 5:8)
        • Followed by en (1722), in someone. (1 John 4:9, 16)
        • The love of Christ means the love which is derived from Christ. (2 Cor. 5:14)
      2. Objectively or passively that love of which God or Christ is the object in the hearts of Christians.
        • Of God. (Luke 11:42; John 5:42; 1 John 2:5)
        • Also used in an absolute sense. (1 John 4:16, 18; 2 John 1:6)
        • Of Christ. (John 15:10; Rom. 8:35)
        • Instead of the genitive mou, mine, we find en te- aGApe- te- eME- meaning "in the love, the one of mine". (John 15:9)
      3. Metaphorically
        • The effect or proof of love, benevolence, benefit conferred. (Eph. 1:15; 3:19; 1 John 3:1)
        • "The love of the truth", meaning the true love, the true and real benefits conferred by God through Christ. (2 Thess. 2:10)
  • Mounce's:
    GK 27 (S 26) Word occurs 116 times.
    Greek-English:
    • Love, generosity, kindly concern, devotedness.
    • Plural, love-feasts. (Jude 12)
    Expository:
    • aGApe- signifies the true and pure love of God to his dear Son. (John 17:26)
    • To his people. (Gal. 6:10)
    • And to a depraved humanity that is in rebellion against him. (John 3:16; Rom. 5:8)
    • In fact, the Bible declares that the very nature of God can be defined as love. (1 John 4:8, 16)
    • We can see that God is love, regardless of our situation in life. Even though we may be under the correction of God, the correction is always guided by love. (Heb. 12:6)
    • It is the love of God that prompts our obedience to him. (John 14:21, using the related verb agaPAo-)
    • aGApe- encompasses the mind, emotions, and will of the individual because it comes from God. As such, we are to live the life of love as demonstrated by the Lord Jesus Christ himself. (Eph. 5:2)
    • Paul tells us, "The fruit of the Spirit is love". (Gal. 5:22)
    • It is only by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit of God that we can internalize and realize the love that God has for us. This type of godly love compels us to look for unmet needs among our fellow human beings. It is godly compulsion which brings us to a point where the world no longer sees us, but rather Christ in us. (2 Cor. 5:14)
    • The above idea prompted the KJV to translate aGApe- as "charity". Derived from the Latin word caritas, charity is characterized in the KJV as an out-showing of God's love and benevolence toward humanity. An inseparable relationship exists between faith, hope, and love, yet the apostle affirms the supremacy of love. (1 Cor. 13)
    • John explains that as the love of the church increases, God will strengthen the hearts of those in the church so that they "will be blameless and holy in the presence of our God". (1 Thess. 3:12-13)
    • God's people are exhorted to be cautious where they place their love. (1 John 2:15)
    • Paul warns young Timothy that "the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils". (1 Tim. 6:10)
    • aGApe- is a beautiful word picture of sacrificial love. It is expressed in the fact that "while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." (Rom. 5:8)
    • As such, aGApe- can be defined as unmerited and unwavering love. God is the originator of this love, and it can only be experienced by one who truly knows God and has received his Son as Lord and Savior. The ultimate expression of God's unmitigated love is the Lord Jesus Christ on Calvary's cross.
  • Vine's:
    • Charity: See Love.
    • Dear, Note: agape is translated "dear" in a KJV verse; the RV, adhering to the noun, has "the Son of His love". (Col. 1:13)
    • Feast.
    • Love, Verb No. 1: agapao and the corresponding noun agape present the characteristic word of Christianity, and since the Spirit of revelation has used it to express ideas previously unknown, enquiry into its use, whether in Greek literature or in the Septuagint, throws but little light upon its distinctive meaning in the NT. (Cf., however, Lev. 19:18; Deut. 6:5)
      • Agape and agapao are used in the NT
        1. To describe the attitude of God toward His Son. (John 17:26)
        2. To the human race, generally. (John 3:16; Rom 5:8)
        3. And to such as believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, particularly. (John 14:21)
      • They are used
        1. To convey His will to His children concerning their attitude one toward another. (John 13:34)
        2. And toward all men. (1 Thess. 3:12; 1 Cor. 16:14; 2 Pet. 1:7)
        3. To express the essential nature of God. (1 John 4:8)
      • Love can be known only from the actions it prompts.
      • God's love is seen in the gift of His Son. (1 John 4:9,10)
      • But obviously this is not the love of complacency, or affection, that is, it was not drawn out by any excellency in its objects. (Rom. 5:8)
      • It was an exercise of the Divine will in deliberate choice, made without assignable cause save that which lies in the nature of God Himself. (Deut. 7:7,8)
      • Love had its perfect expression among men in the Lord Jesus Christ. (2 Cor. 5:14; Eph. 2:4; 3:19; 5:2)
      • Christian love is the fruit of His Spirit in the Christian. (Gal. 5:22)
      • Christian love has God for its primary object, and expresses itself first of all in implicit obedience to His commandments. (John 14:15, 21, 23; 15:10; 1 John 2:5; 5:3; 2 John 6)
      • Self-will, that is, self-pleasing, is the negation of love to God.
      • Christian love, whether exercised toward the brethren, or toward men generally, is not an impulse from the feelings, it does not always run with the natural inclinations, nor does it spend itself only upon those for whom some affinity is discovered.
      • Love seeks the welfare of all. (Rom. 15:2)
      • And works no ill to any. (Rom. 13:8-10)
      • Love seeks opportunity to do good to "all men and especially toward them that are of the household of the faith". (Gal. 6:10; 1 Cor. 13; Col. 3:12-14)
      • In respect of agapao as used of God, it expresses the deep and constant love and interest of a perfect Being towards entirely unworthy objects, producing and fostering a reverential love in them towards the Giver, and a practical love towards those who are partakers of the same, and a desire to help others to seek the Giver.
    • Love, Noun No. 1: agape is always rendered "love" in the RV where the KJV has "charity", a rendering nowhere used in the RV.
      • Where the KJV has "charitably", the RV, adhering to the translation of the noun, has "in love". (Rom. 14:15)
    • Love, Note:
      • In the two statements, "God is love", both are used to enjoin the exercise of love on the part of believers. (1 John 4:8, 16)
      • The former introduces a declaration of the mode in which God's love has been manifested. (1 John 4:9, 10)
      • The second introduces a statement of the identification of believers with God in character, and the issue at the Judgment-Seat hereafter, an identification represented ideally in the sentence "as He is, so are we in this world." (1 John 4:17)
  • Thayer's:
    In signification it follows the verb agaPAo-; consequently it denotes affection, good-will, love, benevolence. (John 15:13; Rom. 13:10; 1 John 4:18)
    • Of the love of men to men; especially of that love of Christians towards Christians which is enjoined and prompted by their religion, whether the love be viewed as in the soul or as expressed. (Matt. 24:12; 1 Cor. 13:1-4, 8; 14:1; 2 Cor. 2:4; Gal. 5:6; Philem. 1:5, 7; 1 Tim. 1:5; Heb. 6:10; 10:24; John 13:35; 1 John 4:7; Rev. 2:4, 19; etc.)
    • Of the love of men towards God: objective genitive he- aGApe- tou theOU. (Lk. 11:42; John 5:42; 1 John 2:15 [tou paTROS]; 3:17; 4:12; 5:3)
    • Of the love of God towards men. (Rom. 5:8; 8:39; 2 Cor. 13:13 [14])
    • Of the love of God towards Christ. (John 15:10; 17:26)
    • Of the love of Christ towards men. (John 15:9ff; 2 Cor. 5:14; Rom. 8:35; Eph. 3:19)
Paronyms
Word: Plural, aGApai

Definition:  Love feasts.

Synonyms
Word: SPLAGCHnon (4698)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    SPLAGCHnon, splangkh'-non; probably strengthened from sple-n, the "spleen".
    An intestine (plural); figuratively pity or sympathy. KJV "bowels, inward affection" + "tender mercy".
  • Zodhiates:
    Bowels of compassion.
  • Thayer's:
    SPLAGCHnon, splagchnou, to, and (only so in the NT) plural SPLAGCHna, SPLAGCHno-n, ta, Hebrew rachamiym, bowels, intestines (the heart, lungs, liver, etc.)
    1. Properly. (Acts 1:18; LXX: 2 Macc. 9:5f; 4 Macc. 5:29)
    2. In the Greek poets from Aeschylus down, the bowels were regarded as the seat of the more violent passions, such as anger and love; but by the Hebrews as the seat of the tenderer affections, especially kindness, benevolence, compassion. Hence, equivalent to our heart. Tender mercies, affections, etc. (1 John 3:17; 2 Cor. 6:12; Phil. 1:18; 2:1)
      • A heart in which mercy resides. Heart of mercy. (Luke 1:78)
      • Also SPLAGCHna oiktirMOU. (Col. 3:12)
      • ta SPLAGCHna auTOU perissoTERo-s eis hyMAS esTIN, his heart is the more abundantly devoted to you. (2 Cor. 7:15)
      • epipoTHO- hyMAS en SPLAGCHnois chrisTOU ie-SOU, in the heart (RV tender mercies) of Christ, i.e. prompted by the same love as Christ Jesus. (Phil. 1:8)
      • anaPAUein ta SPLAGCHna TINos, to refresh one's soul or heart. (Philemon 1:7, 20)
      • ta SPLAGCHna he-MO-N, my very heart, i.e. whom I dearly love. (Philemon 1:12)
      • The Hebrew rachamiym is translated by the LXX:
        • Now oiktirMOS. (Psalm 25:6 [24:6]; Psalm 40:11 [39:12])
        • Now ELeos. (Is. 47:6)
        • Once SPLAGCHna. (Prov. 12:10)
Word: oiktirMOS (3628)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    oiktirMOS, oyk-tir-mos'; from oikTEIro- (3627), to pity.
    Pity. KJV "mercy".
  • Zodhiates:
    Compassion.
  • Thayer's:
    oiktirMOS, oiktirMOU, ho (oikTEIro-), the LXX for rachamiym. The viscera, which were thought to be the seat of compassion. Compassion, pity, mercy.
    • SPLAGCHna oiktirMOU, bowels in which compassion resides, a heart of compassion. (Col. 3:12)
    • In the Scriptures mostly plural (conformably to the Hebrew rachamiym), emotions, longings, manifestations of pity (English "compassions").
    • tou theOU, (Rom. 12:1; Heb. 10:28)
    • ho paTE-R to-n oikTIRmo-n, genitive of quality. The father of mercies i.e. most merciful. (2 Cor. 1:3)
    • Joined with SPLAGCHna. (Phil. 2:1)
Word: philIa (5373)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    philIa, fil-ee'-ah; from PHILos (5384), friend.
    Fondness. KJV "friendship".
  • Zodhiates:
    Friendship.
  • Thayer's:
    philIa, philIas, he- (PHIlos), friendship.
    • With a genitive of the object. (James 4:4)
Word: philanthro-PIa (5363)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    philanthro-PIa, fil-an-thro-pee'-ah; from the same as philanTHRO-po-s (5364), humanely.
    Fondness of mankind, that is, benevolence ("philanthropy"). KJV "kindness, love towards man".
  • Zodhiates:
    Love for man, benevolence, philanthropy.
    It's that disposition which does not always think of self, but takes thought for the needs and wishes of others. It denotes that apparent and ready goodwill usually manifested in a friendly, considerate demeanor, and (especially in the practice of hospitality) readiness to help, tenderheartedness, cherishing and maintaining fellowship. The philanthropist (in this original Greek sense) serves his fellow citizens, protects the oppressed, is mindful of the erring, gentle to the conquered, and self-renouncing in reference to his rights.
  • Thayer's:
    philanthro-PIa, philanthro-PIas, he- (philANthro-pos), from Xenophon, and Plato down.
    • Love of mankind, benevolence. Vulgate "humanitas", RV "kindness". (Acts 28:2; Titus 3:4)
Word: EUnoia (2133)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    EUnoia, yoo'-noy-ah; from the same as eunoEo- (2132), to wish (one) well.
    Kindness; euphemistically conjugal duty. KJV "benevolence, goodwill".
  • Zodhiates:
    Kindness, goodwill, benevolence.
  • Thayer's:
    EUnoia, euNOIas, he- (euNO-S). From Aeschylus down.
    • Good-will, kindness (1 Cor. 7:3; Eph. 6:7)
Word: philadelPHIa (5360)

Definitions:

  • Strong's:
    philadelPHIa, fil-ad-el-fee'-ah; from philADelphos (5361) loving brother.
    Fraternal affection. KJV "brotherly love (kindness), love of the brethren".
  • Zodhiates:
    Brotherly love.
    philanthro-PIa contrasted with philadelPHIa:
    Philanthropy does not occur in the list of Christian virtues. This social virtue in the NT is expressed with the words aGApe- (26) and philadelPHIa (5360), which occupy the place of social righteousness. It is actually one further step to nobility from philanthro-PIa to philadelPHIa, because the latter regards him as a brother while the former considers him only as a fellow human being.
  • Thayer's:
    philadelPHIa, philadelPHIas, he- (philADelphos). The love of brothers (or sisters), brotherly love.
    • Properly. (LXX: 4 Macc. 13:23; 14:1)
    • In the NT "the love which Christians cherish for each other as 'brethren'". Love of the brethren. Vulgate "caritas" or "amor fraternitatis". (Rom. 12:10; 1 Thes. 4:9; Heb. 13:1; 1 Peter 1:22; 2 Peter 1:7, cf. 1 John 5:1)

Back to Top

Back to Study Love Main Index